Event Detail

2
Mar
2015

Saving East Africa’s Rhinos

Michael Dyer
Monday, 2 Mar 2015
Complimentary Drinks Reception 6.30 pm; Lecture 7.30 pm
6/F Three Pacific Place, 1 Queen's Road East

The Royal Geographical Society is pleased to welcome Michael Dyer to lecture on "Saving East Africa’s Rhinos ".  In this lecture, Mr Dyer, a Kenyan who owns a large ranch on the foothills of Mount Kenya, explains how he has built a sustainable conservation model for the rhinoceros.  This model is driven by commerce with the principal economic drivers being tourism along with traditional pastoralist activity.  In particular, he discusses the methods of moving rhino to new territory and explains the process and the effects of increasing breeding rates along with the unique challenges faced under today's poaching threats.

In the lecture, Mr Dyer explains the habitat, threats and situation of the rhinoceros.  He then explores the reasons for his success in expanding and securing habitat for one of Africa's iconic species.  He also discusses the threats and successes to lions and elephants in similar territory.  This includes the positive relationship he has built with neighbouring communities, which includes working together on land management, health care, education and micro enterprise.  In summary, this presentation is the story of a successful conservation model which is now being widely adopted across East Africa, allowing the whole community to become engaged and interdependent.

Michael Dyer is from a well-known Kenyan family and for the last 20 years he has been closely involved with rhino conservation, having become one of Africa’s leading rhino conservationists.  He started his career as a manger of a large cattle and sheep ranch in the early 1980s and realised that if he did not give more attention to healthy environment and ecosystems the country would ultimately loose large tracts of land to unsustainable and exploitive activities.  As the owner of Borana-lodge, he is the proprietor of Africa's largest rhino conservancy, a source of great knowledge on the species, able to talk about anti-poaching techniques, why rhinos are declining and his vision to protect them.  He has facilitated change, in partnership with others, and has delivered new projects that linked good practice to benefits like investment in tourism, including small eco lodges developed across a landscape which now encompasses all of north eastern Kenya and many millions of acres of land.    

    The Royal Geographical Society is pleased to welcome Members and their guests are most welcome to attend this event, which is HK$150 for Members and HK$200 for guests and others, including a complimentary drink.

The Royal Geographical Society - Hong Kong wishes to express its thanks to
 Jones Lang LaSalle

JLL 

and
Aardvark Safaris

aavardis

for their generous assistance with this lecture.
 
 

    

    The Royal Geographical Society is pleased to welcome Michael Dyer to lecture on "Saving East Africa’s Rhinos ".  In this lecture, Mr Dyer, a Kenyan who owns a large ranch on the foothills of Mount Kenya, explains how he has built a sustainable conservation model for the rhinoceros.  This model is driven by commerce with the principal economic drivers being tourism along with traditional pastoralist activity.  In particular, he discusses the methods of moving rhino to new territory and explains the process and the effects of increasing breeding rates along with the unique challenges faced under today's poaching threats.

In the lecture, Mr Dyer explains the habitat, threats and situation of the rhinoceros.  He then explores the reasons for his success in expanding and securing habitat for one of Africa's iconic species.  He also discusses the threats and successes to lions and elephants in similar territory.  This includes the positive relationship he has built with neighbouring communities, which includes working together on land management, health care, education and micro enterprise.  In summary, this presentation is the story of a successful conservation model which is now being widely adopted across East Africa, allowing the whole community to become engaged and interdependent.

Michael Dyer is from a well-known Kenyan family and for the last 20 years he has been closely involved with rhino conservation, having become one of Africa’s leading rhino conservationists.  He started his career as a manger of a large cattle and sheep ranch in the early 1980s and realised that if he did not give more attention to healthy environment and ecosystems the country would ultimately loose large tracts of land to unsustainable and exploitive activities.  As the owner of Borana-lodge, he is the proprietor of Africa's largest rhino conservancy, a source of great knowledge on the species, able to talk about anti-poaching techniques, why rhinos are declining and his vision to protect them.  He has facilitated change, in partnership with others, and has delivered new projects that linked good practice to benefits like investment in tourism, including small eco lodges developed across a landscape which now encompasses all of north eastern Kenya and many millions of acres of land.    

    The Royal Geographical Society is pleased to welcome Members and their guests are most welcome to attend this event, which is HK$150 for Members and HK$200 for guests and others, including a complimentary drink.

The Royal Geographical Society - Hong Kong wishes to express its thanks to
 Jones Lang LaSalle
 and
Aardvark Safaris
for their generous assistance with this lecture.
 
 

    

 

See other events in 2015